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BUSH BEANS


  How To Grow Bush Beans


PLANT TYPE: Annual
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Phaseolus vulgaris
LIGHT: Full Sun
SOIL TYPE: Well-drained, deep sandy loam
pH RANGE: 6.5 - 7.5
MOISTURE/WATERING: Average
MATURITY IN DAYS: 70 - 75
KNOWN PESTS: Root maggots and cutworms
KNOWN DISEASES: Foliar disease, both fungal and bacterial



OVERVIEW:

No garden is complete without bush beans. There are many varieties of bush beans to choose from and every gardener is sure to find one to suit their tastes. Bush beans do well in almost any garden as they are not too fussy about soil.

To ensure the best flavor, bush beans should be picked while still slender and no inner bean is well developed. For fresh bush beans all summer, plant every two weeks and pick frequently.


PROPAGATION / SOWING OF BUSH BEANS:

Direct seed bush beans after risk of frost when soil warms to 18-24°C (65-75°F). Sow bush beans 1" deep and 2" apart in rows 18" (bush beans) to 24" apart (shell beans). Reseed until mid summer for a constant supply all season long. If using untreated bush beans seed, plant thicker and thin to desired density. Use Garden Inoculant at the time of planting to help boost soil fertility*.


COMPANION PLANTING OF BUSH BEANS:

Bush beans are excellent grown with most vegetables except the onion family, basil, fennel, kohlrabi.


CARE & GROWING OF BUSH BEANS:

Both bush bean types require a full sun location, soil pH of 6.5-7.5, and well drained soil. Good air circulation around bush bean plants is essential, especially for late shelling or dry type beans, as they are very susceptible to fungal diseases which prevail later in the season. Bush beans are light feeders; compost or well rotted manures worked into the soil at the time of planting is sufficient.


HARVESTING OF BUSH BEANS:

Use maturity days as an indicator. Harvest once the bush beans are smooth, firm and crisp. Keep bush beans constantly picked to ensure a fresh supply. Bean formation in the pod is a sure sign of over-maturity. Dry & Shell Beans: Harvest when the bush beans pods are completely dry and brittle. Cut or pull pods from bush bean plants and shell the beans. Store beans in an air tight container in a cool dry spot. For fresh eating of horticultural or shell beans, harvest when bean formation starts to take place within the pod.


NOTES:

* Inoculant refers to a type of bacteria (Rhizobia bacteria) that grows on the roots of legumes (beans, peas, clover, alfalfa) to help produce nitrogen. Simply mix the inoculant in a bag with the seed until the seed is coated. Sow seeds and harvest an improved yield.












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Pick your bush beans young and tender. If the weather cooperates, your bush bean plants will keep producing until killed by frost.






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